COCREATIVE CUSTOMER PRACTICES: EFFECTS OF HEALTH CARE CUSTOMER VALUE COCREATION PRACTICES ON WELL-BEING

Janet McColl Kennedy, The University of Queensland, Australia

Suellen Hogan, The University of Queensland, Australia

Lars Witell, Linköping University

Hannah Snyder, The University of Queensland, Australia

 Drawing on three studies using data from six separate samples of 1,151 health care customers, the authors investigate cocreative customer practices, modeling the effects of customer value cocreation practices on well-being. Results highlight that while positive interactions with medical staff (doctors) lead to increased well-being through engaging in coproducing treatment options, interactions with friends and family and their associated cocreated activities have an even greater positive effect on well-being. Interestingly, activities requiring change can have a negative effect on well-being, except in psychological illnesses, where the opposite is true. The authors conclude with theoretical and managerial implications, highlighting that if interactions and activities with medical professionals are supplemented with customer-directed activities, the positive effect on well-being is significantly enhanced.

McColl-Kennedy, J.R., Hogan, S.J., Witell, L. and Snyder, H., 2017. Cocreative customer practices: Effects of health care customer value cocreation practices on well-being. Journal of Business Research, 70, pp.55-66.